Butterfield Show

Butterfield's gas engine alley

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Men who showed their engines during the first years of the show - John Pankratz, Elving and Torger Sul-heim, Ed Streich, Harvey Wahl - have been joined by many more during the years, and now they come from Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin and even Illinois to show

If anything increases in number - besides visitors - each year it's got to be the gas engine exhibit. With the growth of the Butterfield show, word that exhibitors can sit in cool shade and run their engines, it seems only natural that the men who tinker in their workshops all year on gas engine? should show them here.

You can't miss the gas engines, their familiar chugging, nor the friendliness of the exhibitors who love nothing better that to answer questions about their prizes. Men who showed their engines during the first years of the show - John Pankratz, Elving and Torger Sul-heim, Ed Streich, Harvey Wahl - have been joined by many more during the years, and now they come from Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin and even Illinois to show.

The gas engine, of course, provided the farmer with his first real chance to harness energy to do his many backbreaking chores, and you'll be able to see how the engines developed from early prototypes to the more sophisticated just before electricity hit the prairie. And you'll be amazed at the names, the numbers of engines that came out of workshops all over the country. Luckily, many have been preserved by our exhibitors as a reflection of our quest for improving rural life.

Butterfield's 'gas engine alley' is Harvey Wahl's Flour City engine, a 10 hp beauty that weighs 3,300 pounds.

A new addition to Butterfield's 'gas engine alley' is Harvey Wahl's Flour City engine, a 10 hp beauty that weighs 3,300 pounds. Wahl bought the engine at a Valley Springs, S. D. auction and with his son, spent many hours of restoration for the 1975 show.

Two of the rarest engines at the show are pictured here. Only one known duplicate of each exists to local collectors.

Above is Ole Lundberg's 6 horsepower Lightning Engine, manufactured by the Kansas City Hay Press Co. in about 1900. It is a single cylinder 4 cycle engine of opposed-piston type. The engine has one long cylinder barrel with two pistons working in this barrel, with the piston-heads coming nearly together in the middle. It can pull or idle at comparatively low R.P.M.'s, and is efficient because small heat loss requires less water cooling.

Ed Streich's inverted Hart-Parr gas engine was the first gas engine in Selma. Bought new by John F. Stark from the Darfur Elevator back in 1905 for $405, this unique 7 horsepower engine will run on gas, kerosene or alcohol. When you see it running, it will have the original oil it had when new. It is oil cooled and the cylinder points down with the flywheels on top.

This is our 1915 Mogul 8 - 16 tractor. It has the planetary transmission. People are amazed at this tractor when we have it at the steam shows to think this was really used by farmers. We had a new wristpin made for it this winter.

This is our 1926 Rumely Oil Pull 20 - 35 model. We bought it from the late Mr. Ernie Kirk of Marchwell, Sask. in 1965. This tractor had not run since 1946 until 1965. We had no problem in getting it running. There were 30 dead sparrows in the air-intake stack which appeared to have been there for many years. Mice had made nests in the radiator which of course soon disappeared when we got it running.

This is our 1924 Hart Parr 22-40 model. The top which is on it was made by the John Goodison Co., Sarnia, Ontario, distributors of the Hart Parr tractor. The original owner would not buy the tractor unless it had a top that would go over the entire tractor. Its last job of work was pulling train cars loaded with beets along the siding at St. Thomas, Ontario.

Here is my newest toy, a Fairbanks Morse No. 851967, Style D, Type Z 2 H.P. Camshaft speed-750, flywheel speed-500. A little work on the mag, so now it runs real well. Paid $40.00 for it.