An experimental McCormick Deering engine

Experimental Engine

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3156 Waldron Road, Kankakee, Illinois 60901

Probably the rarest of any type engine is an experimental engine that was never mass produced. This engine is a cross between the McCormick Deering model M and model L. At first glance it looks similar to the model L, except that the E.K. magneto is mounted in front of the water jacket instead of alongside of the jacket as the model L's are. It uses the model M choke; magneto eccentric trip rod is identical to the model M except longer, and throttling governor linkage is similar to the model M. Engine is water cooled, but head is air cooled. Oil is put into the engine from the top behind the water jacket. Oil pan is cast aluminum. Specifications are: 3' bore X 3 3/16' stroke. Serial number is Q 563. A letter from the corporate archivist of I.H.C. verifies that it is definitely an experimental, but they have no further records of this particular type of engine.

The story I got from an old I.H.C. man in Kankakee, Ill is that they shipped six of these engines in the late 1920's to give to farmers to use in various applications. After one year of use, the engines were recalled, stripped down, and evaluated. This I.H.C. dealer had orders to destroy the six engines after stripping them down, but he destroyed five and kept the remaining one for himself, which he later traded off for a car. I assume I have the engine that he saved. Whether any other engines were shipped to other parts of the country, and how many were made is unknown. If any other collector has an engine similar to this one, I would appreciate hearing from him. This engine was shown this summer at the following shows: Sandwich, Ill., Will County Threshermen, DeSelm, Ill, Bureau Valley, Ohio, Ill, Blueford, Ill Engine Show; The Old Time Farm Show, Kankakee, Ill, Winamac, Indiana, and Portland, Indiana.


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