REFLECTIONS

A BRIEF WORD

9 HP Briggs & Stratton engine Tractor

20/7/1

Jake Zilverburg

Content Tools

With the machinery in full motion for a coming history of the Allis-Chalmers and Rumely operations, the Reflector finds himself coming and going at breakneck speed this summer. As this copy is being prepared (early July), it seems impossible that we are well into summer, and rapidly heading for autumn! Old-timers used to tell us that time seemed to go by more and more quickly as we got older. At age 20, we didn't pay a whole lot of attention to that idea, but now it seems to make a lot more sense!

Although the correspondence is down slightly this issue, the coming of many major engine shows and other summer activities makes this very understandable.

The Reflector is happy to announce that we will be representing both Gas Engine Magazine and the Iron Men Album at this year's Midwest Old Threshers Reunion, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. We look forward to meeting all of you and will be happy to enter or renew your subscriptions to these magazines.

In the course of answering various queries for engine parts etc., the comment has been made that the Reflector was 'plugging' the goods of a certain firm or individual. Such has not been our intent. To better define this problem, please do not send requests for engine or tractor parts to this columnrather, we ask that you place these in the Classified Section. Many hobby magazines publish an Annual Directory Issue or Buyers' Guide, wherein various vendors may advertise their wares. Stemgas is studying this possibility now, and it may be forthcoming before too long.

20/7/1  Jake Zilverburg, L. P. Route #4, Aitkin, MN 56431 sends us a photo of a tractor he built during the winter of 78-79. Using a 9 HP Briggs & Stratton engine, it has a 1952 International ton steering sector, transmission, and differential. The rear end has been cut down to 38 inches. Top speed is 6 mph. In addition, Mr. Zilverburg has equipped it with a number of attachments. Current plans are to restore an Alamo Type A, 4 horse power engine. Needed are the proper colors, catalog illustrations, and other information.

20/7/2  Q. We have an engine with the following nameplate information: The T. L. Smith Company, Milwaukee, Wis., U. S. A. Engine No. 63778, 475 r.p.m., 3 h.p. If anyone in engine land has such an engine or information on same, please let us know. Terry Warner, RR1, Mackville, KY 40040.

A.American Gas Engines doesn't even list this one in the Master Directory, so the Reflector can't provide any daylight on this one at all.

20/7/3  From Ray Rylander, 805 E. San Rafael St., Colorado Springs, CO 80903 comes this comment: 'It's been my experience that the balancing of a lot of our antique one-lung engines leaves something to be desired. Those early engine designers just seemed to either ignore shake or minimize it by incorporation of a large mass of stationary iron.

'Theoretically I know all the rotating and reciprocating masses should be dynamically balanced on a machine at the design speed of the engine; even so it is impossible to balance out exactly the secondary inertia forces due to the angularity swing of the connecting rod in one-cylinder engines.

'But for us shade-tree flunkies out here in the sticks who might desire a somewhat smoother running engine, just how should we go about better balancing of our little toys?

'Given two level steel parallels for the crankshaft assembly to roll on, should everything be in exact static balance regardless of the crankpin position, or should either the counterweights of the piston-connecting rod assembly be the heavier? And why?'

A.  First of all, the Reflector is no engineer, and would guess to be only about half a mechanic. Given this parameter, we'll try to answer your questions.

1. We do not agree that the early engine designers ignored the vibration problem of one-cylinder engines, nor do we fully subscribe to the idea that adding mass was the final solution. A great many of the early engines were designed and built by people who had almost no formal education, but designed and built primarily from images in their mind. A great many of these men simply were unprepared for the complicated mathematics required to get precise engine balance. In visiting some years ago with a former engineer involved with the Associated engines from Waterloo, Iowa, we found that shop balancing was accomplished by the use of clamp-on weights which varied in size and could be situated anywhere on the flywheel. By this trial and error method, the balance was attained insofar as possible, and at that point the flywheels were drilled exactly opposite from the weights, or lead weight was poured into pockets designed especially for the purpose.

2. Due primarily to the production cost, the great majority of engines used a counterbalanced flywheel instead of butterfly weights mounted directly to the crank cheeks. From the academic viewpoint this was poor design, but it substantially reduced production costs. To further complicate the problem, any engine with a single crankpin, or in which the crankpins are not at 180 degrees is at best a compromise. If one was to balance the rotating parts on parallels in exact static balance, without accounting for the reciprocating parts, then the engine would be out of balance horizontally. Likewise, if all the reciprocating and rotating parts were balanced horizontally, the engine would be out of balance vertically.

Roberts' Gas Engine Handbook gives the following criteria and formula:

The rotating weight consists of the crank arm, the crankpin, and a portion of the connecting rod. The reciprocating weight includes the remaining portion of the connecting rod, the piston, crosshead, and any other reciprocating parts. To find the rotating portion of the connecting rod weight, support the piston end of the rod on a knife edge opposite the center of the bearing in a horizontal position with the other end supported on a scale. The scale weight is considered to be the rotating weight. Simply, five-eighths of the total rod weight can be considered as rotating. The formula will be as follows:

B = weight of both balance weights
M = weight of crankpin + rotating part of rod
K = weight of reciprocating parts + remainder of rod weight
J = weight of both crank arms
m = crank radius (half the stroke)
j = distance from the center of gravity of the crank arm to the center of the shaft
q =distance of the center of gravity of the balance weight from the center of the shaft
THEN,

                    K
         ( M +  2 ) m + Jj
B  =   -----
                    q

In many cases, the Reflector honestly doubts that the running balance can be substantially improved over the original design, although it is conceded that some engines have horrendously poor balance. Although we know of no reprints on the subject at this time, Roberts' Gas Engine Handbook is an excellent reference, as are several other early titles. Perhaps some of these articles might be fully reprinted in future issues of GEM.

20/7/4  Q.What is the year of an old Oliver Cletrac Crawler, s/n 18694? Donovan T. Carson, Box 249, Lesage, WV 25537.

A.  Serial numbers for the Cletrac line were received recently and are reproduced on the next page for your information.

20/7/5  Q.We have recently acquired a Fairmont engine and need some information. It is a Type QHB, 6 HP, s/n 26956. Need the color, year built, etc. Brian Flatmoe, Star Route, Box 510, Meadow, SD 57644.

A.  See March/April 1985 GEM, page page 16, in the 'Readers Write' section for information on getting Fairmont information directly from the company.

20/7/6  Q. Can anyone supply information on a Lalley Light Plant, Model HU44232, 32 volts. It uses a single cylinder, 2-cycle Ferro engine and Atwater-Kent Type CC ignition. Kenneth J. Wells, Jr., 419 Jerome Avenue, Burlington, CT 06013.

A.  All we have found is an old magazine advertisement of about 1920 stating that this unit sold for $625. This, plus an illustration of the engine appears on page 272 of American Gas Engines.

20/7/7  Q.Joe B. Dill, RR 1, Box 26, Lascassas, TN 37085 asks whether anyone has run across an old warehouse scale built into a two-wheel warehouse cart.

A.  We recall seeing one of these years ago in an old grain elevator. The cart did double duty, either to haul feed or to weigh same. Except for that one instance, we never saw another, and would guess these to be very elusive today!

20/7/8  Q. Dennis Silva, 10 Arrowhead Drive, Griswold, CT 06351 is looking for information on a Kinkade garden tractor, s/n 13615.

A.  Due to the great interest in old garden tractors, the Reflector has been actively acquiring early advertising materials, instruction manuals, etc. on these machines. Hopefully, enough material can be gathered to make several presentations in future issues of GEM.

20/7/9  Q. R. F. Durig, 1364 Eileen Drive, Xenia, OH 45385 writes that he has been assured by an auto parts distributor that DuPont Dulux colors are headed for obsolescence in favor of the DuPont Centari line of acrylics.

A.  The Reflector hasn't yet had an opportunity to check this out, either with a local dealer or with DuPont directly. More on this in future issues. Meanwhile, the Dulux color codes easily translate into Centari numbers.

20/7/10  Robert A. Johnson, Route 2, Box 358, Canyon, TX 79015 writes that he has had reasonably good luck finding original paint colors beneath the nameplate. Also, to remove the plate, usually a small pin punch, or even a nail will suffice to drive the brass pins out backwards in some cases.

20/7/11  Ralph R. Look, Wichita, KS writes that in restoring a 1939 Allis-Chalmers B tractor, the front rims were rusted out, although the center disc was OK. Early Volkswagen car rims will press fit these discs, although they are an inch wider than the original 4.00-15 AC tires. By narrowing these to the original width, one can be back in business.

Oliver Crawler Tractor Production 1917-1957

TRACTOR MODEL

YEARS BUILT

SERIAL # START

SERIAL # EXTENT

ENGINE MAKE

TYPE OF ENGINE

R

1916-1917

1

1000

Buda

Gas

H

1917-1919

1001

13755

Weidley

Gas

W (12)

1919-1932

13756

30971

Weidley

Gas

    

Cletrac

Gas

F

1920-1922

1

3000

Cletrac

Gas

20K

1925-1932

101

10207

Cletrac

Gas

30A

1926-1928

6

1421

Wisconsin

Gas

30B (B30)

1929-1930

1601

3057

Wisconsin

Gas

40

1928-1931

101

1833

Wisconsin

Gas

55-40

1931-1932

1835

1889

Wisconsin

Gas

55

1932-1936

1890

3852

Wisconsin

Gas

100

1927-1930

50

158

Wisconsin

Gas

15

1931-1933

76

11999

Hercules

Gas

20C

1933-1936

12000

14547

Hercules

Gas

AG

1936-1937

14548

20201

Hercules

Gas

AG

1937-1942

2X0202

2X3398

Hercules

Gas

AD2

1937-1940

1N00

5N80

Buda

Diesel

BD Four Speed

1936-1939

1D00

4D236

Hercules

Diesel

BD Six Speed

1939-Up

5D000

20D387

Hercules

Diesel

BD2

1937-1938

1P00

1P16

Buda

Diesel

25

1932-1935

76

1372

Hercules

Gas

30G

1935-1936

1C00

2C79

Hercules

Gas

BG Four Speed

1937-1939

2C80

2C798

Hercules

Gas

BG Six Speed

1939-1944

3C000

4C718

Hercules

Gas

BGS

1944-Up

6C000

12C986

Hercules

Gas

40-30

1930-1931

76

399

Hercules

Gas

35

1932-1936

400

2835

Hercules

Gas

CG

1936-1942

2836

3246

Hercules

Gas

  

5M000'

5M608

Hercules

Gas

35D

1934-1935

10000

10217

Hercules

Diesel

40D

1935-1936

10218

10831

Hercules

Diesel

DD Four Speed

1936-1939

10832

11581

Hercules

Diesel

  

1L3000

1L4460

Hercules

Diesel

DG Four Speed

1936-1939

1E00

5E86

Hercules

Gas

EN (E31)

1934-1939

1B00

1B946

Hercules

Gas

E38 Pre-Streamlined

1934-1936

7B30

1B318

Hercules

Gas

E38 Streamlined

1936-1938

2H000

3H168

Hercules

Gas

E42

1938-1942

5H000

5H604

Hercules

Gas

E-62-68-76

1934-1941

1A00

5A330

Hercules

Gas

EHG-62-68-76

1937-1941

1R00

8R52

Hercules

Gas

ED-38-42

1938-1941

1AA00

9AA00

Hercules

Diesel

ED2-38

1937-1941

1S00

1S52

Buda

Diesel

ED2-42

1937-1941

5S00

6S80

Buda

Diesel

ED2-62-68-76

1937-1940

1T00

1T84

Buda

Diesel

EHD2-62-68-76

1938-1941

1V00

4V13

Buda

Diesel

80D

1933-1936

6000

6321

Hercules

Diesel

FD Four Speed

1936-1938

6322

6699

Hercules

Diesel

FD Six Speed

1938-1944

8Y000

9Y124

Hercules

Diesel

FDLC

1941-1945

1HA000

1HA272

Cummins

Diesel

FDE

1945-1952

10Y000

12Y376

Hercules

Diesel

80-60

1930-1932

113

409

Wisconsin

Gas

80

1932-1932

420

499

Wisconsin

Gas

80G

1932-1936

500

849

Hercules

Gas

FG Four Speed

1936-1938

1CA046

1CA054

Hercules

Gas

FG Six Speed

1938-Up

1CA500

1CA880

Hercules

Gas

GG (Twin Row)

1939-1942

1FA000

1FA0164

Hercules

Gas

(Co-op) (General)

 

1FA1000

1FA6886

Hercules

Gas

HG-31-42-60-68

1939-1951

1GA000

4GA998

Hercules

Gas

  

5GA000

51GA998

Hercules

Gas

  

52GA000

59GA858

Hercules

Gas

OC-3; 31-42-60-68*

1951-1957

1WH000

19WH448

Hercules

Gas

OC-3 Kerosene Distillate*

1951-1957

1WH000

19WH448

Hercules

Gas

OC-3-31 Cane*

1952-1957

1WC000

1WC312

Hercules

Gas

AG-6*

1944-Up

3X000

3X8829

Continental

Gas

  

3X8830

Up

Continental

Gas

AD*

1937-Up

1Z00

Up

Hercules

Diesel

DG Six Speed*

1939-Up

7E00

Up

Hercules

Gas

DD Six Speed*

1939-Up

1L5000

Up

Hercules

Diesel

0C-4-G

1956-Up

1TG000

Up

Hercules

Gas

OC-6-G*

1954-Up

1RM000

Up

Waukesha

Gas

0C-6-D*

1954-UP

1RCOOO

Up

Waukesha

Diesel

0C-12-G

1954-Up

1JR000

Up

Hercules

Gas

OC-12-D

1954-Up

1JXO0O

Up

Hercules

Diesel

OC-15-D

1956-Up

1VL000

Up

Hercules

Diesel

OC-18*

1952-Up

1KS000

Up

Hercules

Diesel

'During years 1953 and 1954, these tractors were numbered consecutively in the 3500000 and 4500000 series.

'During years 1953 and 1954, these tractors were numbered consecutively in the 3500000 and 4500000 series.

20/7/12  Q. Marvin E. Ruebush, Route 5, Box 187-C, Staunton, VA 24401 is looking for information on an Ellis 3 HP, 2-cycle engine. Also, the question is raised of an article on page 17 of the May /June, 1971 issue of GEM regarding Ellis.

A.  This catalog was supplied by Broken Kettle Books, RR 1, Akron, IA 51001.

20/7/13  Q. Clayton Brimmer, 17430 Yankee Road, Motley, MI 49336 asks for information on a Sears Farmaster enginepaint colors, ignition, etc.

A.  You are probably referring to the Cushman Cub engine sold by Sears as the Farmaster. These are not especially rare, so finding information should not be too difficult.

20/7/14  Q. I have a wrench marked Independent on one side, and SP 116 with the IHC logo on the other side. Where does Independent fit into the IHC picture? Gilbert Irps, 3156 Waldron Road, Kankakee, IL 60901.

A.  As we recall, Independent was another of the IHC acquisitions sometime around 1910-1912. Our files are rather thin on this point, so some deeper research will be necessary. With the big anti-trust suit that plunged IHC into problems for several years, each acquired company functioned as a separate entity under the IHC umbrella. Thus, the Deering and McCormick lines operated more or less independently, and in direct competition with each other for several years until the suit was finally resolved.

20/7/I5  Q. Need information on the Gladden garden tractor of which a photo is shown. It is a Model BB, sn BB24711, 2 x 3 inch bore and stroke. Built by Gladden Products, Glendale 4, CA. John D. Stoltzfus, Rt 41 & 10, Box 295, Cochranville, PA 19330.

20/7/16  Q. Need information such as color, etc. on a 4 HP Woodpecker, sn 7918, Type KBB. John K. Rinehart, Box 267, Oldwick, NJ 08858.

A.  Pages 304 and 305 of American Gas Engines illustrate several Woodpecker styles, but we have no color information at present.

20/7/17  Q.Butch McAuliffe, Box 305, Wye Mills, MD 21679 needs information and proper colors for a 2 HP Jaeger engine.

READERS WRITE

20/3/41  Ignitor Points Dennis Miller, Ricanton, MN 55922 writes that he has successfully used nail heads to make ignitor points.

Stuck Pistons Regarding the stuck piston dilemma, Dale Nickerson, 8670 Glasgow Road, Cassadaga, NY 14718 writes that he resorted to building a fire under, around, and over the water jacket, getting the whole works red hot. After letting it cool down slowly, penetrating oil was liberally applied to the piston. A little persuasion with a hardwood block and a sledge usually brings the piston out easily. CAUTION: Be sure to first remove the nameplate and any other small or loose parts before starting this operation! If the parts are badly rusted, soaking in water overnight after the heat treatment seems to help immensely.

20/4/10  Middlings Mill  Jim Jones, 200 S. Spruce St., Centerville, IN 47330 writes concerning wheat middlings. This is the coarse wheat particles sifted or bolted out of the flour and with the bran flakes removed. In a multiple stage roller mill, these middlings are processed in succeeding roller stages. The middling mill mentioned in Joe Morris' letter would probably have been a secondary mill, grinding the middlings after the first break. It would not have accepted whole wheat grains, but the sittings from the first grinding.

20/3/12  Schebler Floats  Jan van der Gugten, 2633 Ware Street, Abbotsford, BC V2S 3E2, Canada writes that he uses cork such as is found with a woodburning set, laminating the pieces together with 'plastic resin glue' then finishing to the proper shape. Also requested is information on color, etc. for the Fairbanks-Morse #2 Eclipse.

20/2/17Tiny Tim Power Plant The Reflector inadvertently omitted the writer's name for this one. Our apologies! Should you have any information on the Tiny Tim, please contact: William R. Hembly, RR 3, Macomb, IL 61455.

20/2/17  Sieverkropp Engines Owen W. Hawkins Jr., 11415 Colfax Road, Glen Allen, VA 23060 has forwarded photo copies of some extensive Sieverkropp material which appeared in the Nov./Dec., 1978 issue of Antique Gas Engine & Tractor Magazine. This Canadian journal is no longer published, and copies are tough to locate. Perhaps we might be able to reproduce some of this data in a future issue of GEM.

McCormick-Deering Hoods Nick Jonkman, RR2, Wyoming, Ontario NON 1TO Canada sent a letter to Reflections sometime ago noting that they were contemplating limited production of hoods and side sheets for the 10-20 and 15-30 McCormick-Deering tractors. For further information, please write to the above address.

20/1/19  Jacobsen Lawn Mowers John A. Ecker, 1870 Wallace Lake Rd., West Bend, WI 53095 writes that he had a Jacobsen mower and encloses a photo of same. He also has the original manual for his machine.

Norbert Keeley Castings Several people wrote concerning the model Fairbanks-Morse Eclipse on page 12 of the June issue. All were interested in knowing where these castings might be found. Please let us know!

20/4/14  A-C WC Serial Numbers WC 20941935, WC248101936, WC560061937. This information was submitted by Milton W. Fox, RR 1, Bicknell, IN 47512. Further information on AC serial numbers will follow.

20/2/26  John Deere Serial Numbers Jamie Arnold, 6510 Panton St., Kilbride, Ontario LOP 1G0 Canada sends us this list of serial numbers for John Deere 'E', 'EK', and 'EP' engines.

Year

Serial # Run

# Built

1923

235001-235520

519

1924

235521-239584

4063

1925

239585-251330

15345

1926

251331-267415

16084

1927

267416-278809

11393

1928

278810-293418

14608

1929

293419-309640

16221

1930

309641-320082

10441

1931

320083-324624

4541

1932

324625-326377

1752

1933

326378-327780

1402

1934

327781-330830

3049

1935

330831-336008

5177

1936

336009-340879

4870

1937

340880-346131

5251

1938

346132-348081

1949

1939

348082-349924

1842

1940

349925-352434

2509

1941

352435-354899

2464

1942

354900-355866

966

1943

355867-356600

733

1944

356601-360791

4190

1945

360792-365478

4686

1946

365479-367985

2506

Note that this list also appears on page g as part of an article on the John Deere Model E.

CORRECTIONS

On Page 9 of the June, 1985 issue, the Reflector incorrectly attributed the receipt of some Delco materials to Mr. Gene L Brandt, Nashua, MT 59248. Interested Delco collectors have of course written to Mr. Brandt to discover the error. Because of the large amount of mail, the Reflector knows not whence this material came, so will the sender kindly let us know? This way we can refer other Delco collectors your way. Our apologies!

A CLOSING WORD

As we noted at the beginning, we will be representing Stemgas Publishing Company at the Midwest Old Threshers Reunion this year. We look forward to seeing many of you, and hope we can spend a few minutes visiting about 'old engines.'

Editor's note: Many of you have had the pleasure of dealing with Durward and Koletta Steinmetz who for years represented Stemgas at Mt. Pleasant. The Steinmetz's are retiring from this endeavor and Mr. Wendel will continue to serve you on behalf of Stemgas.

The purpose of the Reflections column is to provide a forum for the exchange of all useful information among subscribers to GEM. Inquiries or responses should be addressed to: REFLECTIONS, Gas Engine Magazine, P.O. Box 328, Lancaster, PA 17603.

W. E. Neal of 613 8th Avenue, Charles City, Iowa 50616 recently wrote to say he thought a lot of people would like to know when Hart Parr and Oliver tractors were made. Below is a portion of an official list which Neal got from the Oliver Company. We ended the list at 1935, when the Hart Parr name was dropped. A complete list of Oliver serial numbers is published by Alan King.

OLIVER TRACTOR SERIAL NUMBERS-FROM YEAR 1898 Years built-Tractor or Unit Series-Serial Number Range

 

HART-PARR (1898-1929)

   

YEARS

SERIES

SERIAL #8

   

1898-

Stationary

1-1 305

YEARS

SERIES

SERIAL #8

1904

Engines

 

1924

Washer 'A'

1 001-2 000

1901

17-30

1 205 (No. 1)

 

10-20 C

35 761-35 922

1902

17-30

1 206 (No. 2)

 

15-30 C

21 899-22 500

1903

18-30

1 207 (No. 3)

 

22-40

70 021-70 113

 

17-30

1 208-1 219

 

30-60

Special (4)

 

22-45

1 220-1 245

 

12-24 E

36 001-36 074

1904

22-45

1 306-1 345

 

16-30 E

22 501-22 601

1905

17-30

1 346-1 347

1925

22-40

70 114-70 250

 

22-45

1 364-1 393

 

12-24 E

36 075-36 600

 

22-45

1 415-1 434

 

16-30 E

22 601-24 000

1906

17-30

1 435-1 454

 

Washer 'A'

2 001-2 700

 

22-45

1 445 (Canada)

1926

22-40

70 251-70 493

 

22-45

1 455-1 604

 

12-24 E

36 601-37 194

1907

30-60

1 605-1 810

 

16-30 F

24 001-25 650

1908

30-60

1 811-2 014

 

18-36 G

26 001-26 359

 

40-80

2 015-2 018

 

Washer 'A'

2 701-3 300

1909

40-80

2 019-2 024

 

Washer 'B'

3 301-4 571

 

30-60

2 325-2 331

1927

22-40

70 494-70 500

1910

15-30

2 332-2 352

 

12-24 E

37 195-38 118

 

30-60

2 432-3 310

 

18-36 G

26 360-28 850

 

40-80

2 025-2 100

 

18-36 H

28 851-29 635

1911

30-60

3 311-3 999

 

28-50

70 501-70 718

 

15-30

2 353-2 382

 

Washer 'B'

4 572-5 571

 

40-80

2 0101-2 200

1928

12-24 E

38 119-39 601

 

60-100

4 000-4 100

 

12-24 H

39 602-39 686

1912

20-40

4 112-4 211

 

28-50

70 719-70 967

 

15-30

2 383-2 431

 

18-36 H

29 636-34 566

 

30-60

4 212-4 711

1929

  
 

40-80

2 200-2 275

   
 

60-100

4 101-4 111

Hart-Parr Co. merged with Oliver Farm Equipment Co. See following charts.

1913

20-40

4 714-4 763

 

30-60 40-80

4 814-5 261 2 276-2 300

1929

12-24 H

39 687-42 277

1914

20-40

4 764-4 813

 

18-36 H

34 567-35 000

 

30-60

5 262-5 440

 

18-36 H

85 001-89 158

 

40-80

2 300-2 324

 

28-50

70 968-71 400

 

12-27

5 816-5 992

1930

12-24 H

42 278-43 253

 

Red Devil

6 219-6 244

 

18-36 H

89 159-90 698

1915

30-60

5 441-5 521

 

28-50

71 401-71 707

 

12-27

5 993-6 039

 
 

18-35

6 040-6 153

Note: Horizontal engines were discontinued, only vertical engines used from here on.

 

Red Devil

6 245-6 743

1916

30-60

5 522-5 551

   
 

18-35

6 154-6 199

 

Row Crop Single

100 001-102 648

 

Red Devil

6 744-6 943

 

18-28

800 001-800 459

1917

30-60

5 486-5 640

 

'28' P. Unit

Same

 

18-35

6 200-6 215

 

28-44

500 001-503 599

 

18-35

8 201-8 358

 

'44' P. Unit

Same

1918

18-35

8 359-8 400

1931

Row Crop Single

102 649-103 300

 

30-60

5 641-5 715

 

18-28

800 460-800 963

 

12-25

  

'18' Ind

900 001-900 006

 

15-30 A

8 401 -9 383

 

28-44

503 600-506 184

 

New Hart-Parr

  

Row Crop Dual

103 301-103 318

1919

15-30 A

9 384-13 025

1932

Row Crop

103 319-103 617

 

'35' R. King

20 001 -20 050

 

18-28

800 964-800 984

1920

15-30 A

13 026-17 915

 

'80' Ind.

900 007-900 018

1921

15-30 A

18 470-18 850

 

28-44

506 185-506 211

 

10-20 B

35 001-35 216

 

'99' Ind.

700 001 -700 004

 

30 & 36 S.E.

55 001-55 235

1933

Row Crop

103 618-104 038

 

20 & 24 S.E.

60 001-60 084

 

18-28

800 985-801 050

 

40 & 50 S.E.

80 001-80 240

 

'80' Ind.

900 019-900 021

1922

15-30 A

18 851-19 125

 

28-44

506 212-506 254

 

10-20 B

35 217-35 319

 

'99' Ind.

700 005-700 033

 

10-20 C

35 501-35 527

1934

Row Crop

104 039-104 850

 

15-30 C

21 001-21 392

 

18-28

801 051-801 240

1923

'55' Compr.

75 001-75 039

 

'80' Ind.

900 022-900 036

 

'90' Compr.

65 001-65 237

 

28-44

506 255-506 400

 

10-20 C

35 528-35 760

 

'99' Ind.

700 034-700 141

 

15-30 C

21 393-21 898

   
 

22-40

70 001-70 020

From 1935 to 1937 on Oliver dropped the Hart-Parr name.