Hercules Engine News

Including Economy, Arco, Jaeger & Thermoil

Kerosene Mixing Valve

Fig. 1

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20601 Old State Road, Haubstadt, Indiana 47639

In this, the last of a three part series on fuel mixers used on Hercules built engines, the various kerosene mixers will be discussed.

During the 1914-16 period both the Hercules and Economy brand engines were available as kerosene hit and miss and gasoline only versions. The kerosene version apparently wasn't very popular because they are seldom seen. There were two versions. The earlier one is shown in Figure 1. It had a two valve mixer with a three way cock to switch from the gasoline starting tank (No. 97) to the main tank in the engine base. One valve on the mixer adjusted the fuel and the other adjusted the water when running on kerosene.

Figure 2 shows the later version. The primary difference is the use of a three valve mixer and the elimination of the three way cock. The mixer had a gasoline valve, a kerosene valve and a water valve.

Both of these kerosene systems were available as original equipment. The complete attachment could be ordered to convert a gasoline hit and miss engine to a kerosene hit and miss engine. It's doubtful that many of these conversion kits were sold.

KEROSENE MIXING VALVE ONLY No. 90

KEROSENE ATTACHMENT COMPLETE No. 109

MIXING VALVE ONLY.. No. 90

OUTFIT COMPLETE AS SHOWN No. 109

Figure 3 illustrates an engine equipped with the three valve system.

Figure 4 shows a cutaway view of the kerosene mixer used on throttling governed Hercules kerosene engines models EK through XK and 6 and 8 HP Economy kerosene engines model XK. The mixer had a fuel bowl that was filled with gasoline for starting and warm up. It was then switched to kerosene.

Figure 5 illustrates the kerosene mixer used on the 1 and 2 HP model SK, the 1 through 3 HP model XK and 1 and 2 HP JK engines.

Coming up next will be stories as told by some former Hercules Gas Engine Company employees.

Kerosene Carburetor

THE Hercules kerosene carburetor was designed to make possible the use of kerosene as a satisfactory fuel and is the result of almost ten years' experimental work upon the part of one of the best engineers in the United States and one who is considered authority on internal combustion engines.

The importance of this feature is specially appreciated in foreign markets where the cost of kerosene is so much lower than that of gasoline.