Gas Engine Blogs >

Field Notes

Fuller & Johnson Double Efficiency Correction

Fuller and Johnson Double Efficiency 

The Fuller & Johnson Double Efficiency shown on Page 5 of the February/March 2017 issue is a 5 hp engine, not a 3 hp as stated, as the smallest size did not have a sight glass on the hopper, used a different style muffler and, based on the flywheel size, does not scale properly when compared to the gentleman standing next to the engine. Feel free to add my email and website www.fullerjohnsonengines.com to your GEM Experts list.

Nick Lozzi
fullerjohnsonengines@gmail.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Challenge and Associated Engines

challenge engine 

Enclosed are two pictures of me coupling two gas engines together to seat in the rings on the green engine. The engine is a circa-1917 Challenge 2 hp made in Batavia, Illinois, just outside Chicago. I was never happy with the compression. I re-cut the 1/4-inch piston ring grooves to 5/16-inch. This squared up the piston ring lands, which were well worn. The new rings needed some run time before trying to start it up. I had this 2-1/4 hp Associated air-cooled engine that I planned to sell, and which had sat for over 20 years. I got it running and put it to work spinning the 2 hp Challenge for a couple of hours. I live in an urban setting and don’t want a lot of noise escaping from my yard and offending my neighbors. The car muffler helped with noise reduction.

The Challenge always ran OK, but had some blow-by; that is now gone. I have owned it about 45-47 years. The 2-1/4 hp Associated got a good workout that day and was later sold, as I have another one on a wagon with a magneto. I bought this Associated in the mid-1970s. The shop foreman standing on the Challenge is giving us the High Five for a job well done.

Dave Irey
6348 Mildred Ave.
Edina, MN 55439


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Drag Saw Engine Identified

Beaver engine

Drag saw/log saw collector Chris Jerue contacted us in reference to an unidentified engine query submitted by Ron Sindorf in the April/May 2016 issue (51/3/8: “A surprise phone call”). “The drag saw engine that was in question by Ron Sindorf was built by The Beaver Motor Car Co. in Gresham, Oregon,” Chris writes. “It was commonly sold as a Cascade or a Climax when distributed by Sears and Montgomery Ward, respectively. Note the button-up crankcase style. This differentiates it from Wade, Vaughan, Timber Wolf, etc.; none of the other makes look anything like a Beaver engine.”


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Bridge Engine Identified as a Double Efficiency

Bridge under construction

Longtime reader and vintage car and engine enthusiast David Kolzow sent in this very interesting period photograph of a bridge under construction near La Moille, Illinois, likely sometime in the 1905-1915 era. A belt can just be seen running from the rear of the engine, perhaps driving a mud pump.

David didn’t identify the make or year of the engine, but it’s a Double Efficiency made by Fuller & Johnson Mfg. Co., Madison, Wisconsin. Available from 1905 to 1913, there were two different types of DE engines; a line of 3-9 hp pushrod engines (of which this is one; probably a 3 hp) and a line of 8-20 hp sideshaft engines. Of headless design, the cylinder and water hopper were a single large casting.

David Kolzow
615 E. Union St.
Earlville, IL 60518


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Fairbanks-Morse Display Cabinet

cabinet 

sign 

Mitch Malcolm at Lightning Magneto sent in some pics of a neat old Fairbanks-Morse service cabinet he picked up and has been displaying at swap meets. According to Mitch, it was a factory-supplied dealer’s repair parts display cabinet. “Judging from the parts in it, it’s for the early Z engines from the Jack Jr. up through the 6 hp,” Mitch says, adding that the cabinet contains “gaskets, valves, springs, some igniter parts, ring sets, cam and crankshaft gears, fuel lines and an AB-33 Bosch magneto long trip arm. After having been at the swap meet I found that there are several others around, so they are not that rare.” Rare enough, we’d say, and a neat addition to any collection, especially Fairbanks-Morse.

Mitch Malcolm mitchmalcolm@hotmail.com


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Alamo Empire Runs and Looks Like New

Here are a few pictures of an engine that I recently restored and thought I would send you a before and after. I purchased the engine in August 2015, got it running, took it to a couple of shows, then tore it down, cleaned all the parts, and removed all the rust and old paint.

It is an Empire built by Alamo Mfg. Co., Hillsdale, Michigan, and sold by Empire Cream Separator Co., Bloomington, New Jersey. I finished the restoration and the new cart in February this year (2016) and I intend to take it to shows this year. The engine runs like new! I’m really proud of it!

Gordon I. Woffenden
Newport, NH

Before:

Alamo

Alamo

After:

Alamo

Alamo<


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com

Unknown Engine or Compressor Might be a Bourke Engine

Concerning Flywheel Forum 51/4/6: Engine or Compressor? in the June/July 2016 issue, it’s hard to tell from just two photographs, but it appears that there is a radial engine coupled to what looks like a Bourke engine. Russell Bourke experimented with his engine in the 1920s and 1930s. It would be interesting to learn more of this engine, where it was found, etc. The Bourke engine is famous for its opposing pistons and Scotch yoke inside, which made a smooth running engine.

Magic Bill/via email

unknown 

Thanks for the tip, Magic Bill. While it’s hard to verify from the photos sent in by Webb Marner, you might be on to something. Granted patent number 2,172,670 in 1939, the first Bourke engine was a 2-stroke flat twin. Both pistons traveled in the same direction at the same time, and it was designed to run without spark ignition once warm, effectively transitioning to a dieseling engine, yet burning gasoline. The 2-cylinder unit shown in Webb Marner’s photos has a crankcase-mounted carburetor, which lines up with a 2-stroke design.

The Bourke engine’s Scotch yoke, essentially a slotted link keyed to the connecting rod and the crankshaft to transfer the piston’s linear motion to rotational motion, made it possible to construct multi-cylinder rotary engines, suggesting the possibility that both engines in the photos are Bourke engines. However, it might simply be a flight of fancy, as Don Kuhl of Peebles, Ohio, thinks, who wrote in to say “it appears to me to be a fairly elaborate ‘do nothing’ machine.”

To see a neat animation of a Scotch yoke in action, check out the GIF below. – GEM

animated bourke engine


Please send your questions and comments for Flywheel Forum to Gas Engine Magazine, 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609-1265 or email editor@gasenginemagazine.com